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'[EE] ROHS and batteries in equipment for use in Eu'
2005\08\03@103121 by Russell McMahon

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Batteries are exempt from ROHS but are instead covered by

           Council Directive 91/157/EEC (Batteries and Accumulators)

               http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/en/consleg/pdf/1991/en_1991L0157_do_001.pdf

Anyone wanting to use batteries in equipment for use in Europe should be
aware of this directive (and should have been years ago).

           RM

__________________________

     RoHS Explained

     RoHS: The European Union (EU) Directive on the Restriction of certain
Hazardous Substances EU Directives must be transposed in each EU state into
binding National legislation. This will restrict the use of certain
substances in electrical and electronic equipment placed on the EU market
beginning July 1, 2006.
     The Directive seeks to limit the chance of hazardous substances
possibly leaching out and polluting the environment during end-of-life
recycling or disposal in landfills. The electronics industry is most
affected by the restriction on lead, as it is a key component in electronic
component packaging (pins), solders and solder pastes. While the term
"lead-free" is sometimes used to describe RoHS, the real requirement for
manufacturers is to design and ship products that are not only lead-free but
fully RoHS compliant, meaning they do not contain more than the allowances
of any of the hazardous substances named in the directive.

     The hazardous substances and the proposed maximum concentrations
levels are:

           Lead - Pb  0.1% Max Concentration
           Mercury - Hg  0.1% Max Concentration
           Cadmium - Cd  0.01% Max Concentration
           Hexavalent Chromium - Cr(V1)  0.1% Max Concentration
           Polybrominated Biphenyls - PBB  0.1% Max Concentration
           Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers - PBDE  0.1% Max Concentration



2005\08\03@164952 by Ruben Jönsson

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The RoHS directive does not include all electronics but mainly consumer type of equipment. The included categories are, according to article 2.1, stated in the WEEE directive:

1 - Large household appliances
2 - Small household appliances
3 - IT and telecommunications equipment
4 - Consumer equipment
5 - Lighting equipment
6 - Electric and electronic tools (with the exception of large-scale stationary industrial tools)
7 - Toys, leisure and sports equipment
10 - Automatic dispensers

In addition - Electric light bulbs and luminaires in households.

Categories 8 and 9 are (for now) exluded:

8 - Medical devices
9 - Monitoring and control instruments.

Stationary industrial equipment (equipment that is part of large-scale stationary industrial tools, machines and plants) and monitoring and control instruments are exluded which means that most of our products are exluded. At least for a couple of years more.

Regards / Ruben

{Quote hidden}

==============================
Ruben Jönsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmö, Sweden
TEL INT +46 40142078
FAX INT +46 40947388
spam_OUTrubenTakeThisOuTspampp.sbbs.se
==============================

2005\08\03@235310 by William Chops Westfield

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>> The hazardous substances and the proposed maximum concentrations
>> levels are:
>>
>>             Lead - Pb  0.1% Max Concentration

Ok, now I'm confused.  I would think that the average piece of
manufactured electronics gear would come out well below 0.1% Pb
even when manufactured with regular lead-based solder...

BillW

2005\08\04@014946 by Chen Xiao Fan

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I am wondering what the monitoring and control instruments
really means? Most of the automation components (sensors,
sensor interfaces, PLCs, DCS, etc) will fall in this
category, right? Then the company I am working for now
(produces sensor and sensor interface cards) will be excluded.
However the manufacturing guys and the purchasing guys are talking about ROHS quite often recently. Lead free solders
are used in the SMT process right now. Maybe we are just
preparing for the future.

Regards,
Xiaofan

-----Original Message-----
From: Ruben Jönsson
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 4:50 AM
...
Categories 8 and 9 are (for now) exluded:

8 - Medical devices
9 - Monitoring and control instruments.

Stationary industrial equipment (equipment that is part of large-scale stationary industrial tools, machines and plants) and monitoring and control

instruments are exluded which means that most of our products are exluded.
At least for a couple of years more.

Regards / Ruben

2005\08\04@030135 by Ruben Jönsson

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Take a look at the following document, it will give examples of all categories:

<http://www.dti.gov.uk/sustainability/weee/WEEEguidance_draft.pdf>

And here is another document regarding the RoHS itself:

<http://www.dti.gov.uk/sustainability/weee/RoHS_Regs_Draft_Guidance.pdf>

Regards / Ruben

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> {Original Message removed}

2005\08\04@035623 by Alan B. Pearce

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>>             Lead - Pb  0.1% Max Concentration
>
>Ok, now I'm confused.  I would think that the average piece of
>manufactured electronics gear would come out well below 0.1% Pb
>even when manufactured with regular lead-based solder...

This is one of the "grey areas" that has been confusing people. Some people
(manufacturers) have attempted to get it interpreted this way, and others
are saying that the percentage is of just the solder in the equipment. I
believe there has been a determination made, which leans towards the latter,
but I have no concrete information to hand on this.

2005\08\05@093631 by peiserma

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piclist-bounces@mit.edu wrote:
>>>             Lead - Pb  0.1% Max Concentration
>>
>> Ok, now I'm confused.  I would think that the average piece of
>> manufactured electronics gear would come out well below 0.1% Pb
>> even when manufactured with regular lead-based solder...
>
> This is one of the "grey areas" that has been confusing people. Some
> people (manufacturers) have attempted to get it interpreted this way,
> and others are saying that the percentage is of just the solder in
> the equipment. I believe there has been a determination made, which
> leans towards the latter, but I have no concrete information to hand
> on this.

yes, some time ago. Since this seems to be of great interest to many
people here, I've pasted the clarification issued. This is the draft
version, but I believe it to be official. The last example pretty
much says it all. They take it down to the bonding wires inside an
IC package, and most definitely not the entire assembly.


For the purposes of Article 5(1)(a): a maximum concentration
value of 0.1% by weight in homogeneous materials for lead, mercury,
hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polybrominated
diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and of 0.01% weight in homogeneous materials for
cadmium shall be tolerated.

Homogeneous material means a material that can not be mechanically
disjointed into different materials.

Definitions:
The term "homogeneous" is understood as "of uniform composition
throughout". Examples of "homogeneous materials" are individual types
of: plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins,
coatings.

The term "mechanically disjointed" means that the materials can be,
in principle, separated by mechanical actions such as for example:
unscrewing, cutting, crushing, grinding and abrasive processes.

Examples:
A plastic cover is a "homogeneous material" if it consists of one
type of plastic that is not coated with or has attached to it or
inside it any other kinds of materials. In this case the limit
values of the directive would apply to the plastic.

An electric cable that consists of metal wires surrounded by
non-metallic insulation materials is an example of a "non
homogeneous material" because the different materials could be
separated by mechanical processes. In this case the limit values
of the directive would apply to each of the separated materials
individually.

A semi-conductor package contains many homogeneous materials which
include; plastic moulding material, tin-electroplating coatings on
the lead frame, the lead frame alloy and gold-bonding wires.

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