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'[OT]: Pre soundcard music'
2000\08\04@093701 by Bob Ammerman

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In about 1975 I used a Data General Supernova minicomputer (serial number
38) to generate sound using wavetable generation through a digital to analog
converter. I was able to get a sample rate of about 60 KHz, but was limited
to a single (arbitrary waveform) note at a time. My magnum opus was Also
Sprach Zarasuthra (sp?), the theme from 2001, A Space Odyssey.

Also, using a an AM radio for music goes back _way_ before the TRS-80 Model
1! I had a friend that wrote such a program for an IBM 1130 computer, around
1972 or so. It played Flight of the Bumblebee. Very impressive! You could
put the radio on the other side of the room and still pick up the signal.

Even before that, people were generating music using the _printer_ on an IBM
1401 computer (maybe mid 60's?). The printer used a chain that ran in a
continuous loop and contained the characters on little slugs of metal type.
As the correct character went by a print position, a solenoid would fire a
little hammer and smash the chain into a ribbon to impress the character on
the paper. By carefully deciding what characters to print in what positions,
the frequency of the solenoid hits could be adjusted. I believe the most
popular song using this technology was Anchors Aweigh.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)

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2000\08\04@095357 by M. Adam Davis

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There is also music for dot matrix printers.  One can even find MP3's of dot
matrix printers online.

-Adam

Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2000\08\04@100240 by Marcus Johansson

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A friend of mine used to make his Commodore 64 diskdrive (1541) play tunes by Pink
Floyd. This was achieved by pulsing the pickup back and forth in the right
frequencies. The drive didn't last very long, however :-)

/Marcus

"M. Adam Davis" wrote:

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2000\08\04@102728 by Jinx

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A friend of mine had a program that would play tunes on the head
of a Commodore 1541 floppy drive. Had great fun with it until the
locking screw shook itself loose, which cost $30 to get re-aligned

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2000\08\04@133212 by Alan B. Pearce

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>By carefully deciding what characters to print in what positions,
>the frequency of the solenoid hits could be adjusted. I believe the most
>popular song using this technology was Anchors Aweigh.

Probably because only the navy had the spare time and machines to play with???
;-)

I have heard the various stories about using a printer and a radio to generate
tunes, and I have also heard that tremendous time and effort went into both
processes. I shudder to think how many trees were cut down for someone to play a
tune on a printer!

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2000\08\16@163919 by Phillip Vogel

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I actually heard the music on an IBM (don't remember the model) chain printer
in the early seventies. Very inspiring :-)

And, way back when (maybe 1980), I was working on a machine with a couple of
hundred relays in it, and a mess of LEDs on the front panel. For a trade show,
I made it play music on the relays and do scrolling messages on the LEDs. The
boss loved it, and once again, I got paid to play with my toys.

Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2000\08\16@174309 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>>By carefully deciding what characters to print in what positions,
>>the frequency of the solenoid hits could be adjusted. I believe the most
>>popular song using this technology was Anchors Aweigh.
>
>Probably because only the navy had the spare time and machines to play with???
>;-)

Probably Grace Hopper developed it as a recruiting tool :-)

>I have heard the various stories about using a printer and a radio to generate
>tunes, and I have also heard that tremendous time and effort went into both
>processes. I shudder to think how many trees were cut down for someone to
play a
>tune on a printer!

I had a later version of that (circa 1980); it was supposed to play
via the INT REQ line of an 8080.  Unfortunately, my Z80 had no such
pin!  However, I'd heard enough stories about radios that I immediately
went and got one and found the music 'on the radio'.

Barry

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2000\08\16@180230 by James Paul

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Yea, after she found out that 1 nanosecond is about one foot of wire,
she had to change measurement systems to get a handle on
milliseconds.   Hence, the printer belt.

                                           Regards,

                                            Jim




On Wed, 16 August 2000, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

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spam_OUTjimTakeThisOuTspamjpes.com

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