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'[OT]: What should I pay for a Wimsh u'
2000\08\09@113848 by Dan Michaels

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Dennis Plunkett wrote:
>        Yes there are Australian standards for lighting protrection (Be
>warned that these are only recomendations) and UL1529, and FCC regs too,
>Telstra Australais has 1537 (Some nasty shit in there, but is is fun!!!!!)
>But most of these are for telecoms equipment, however they also do approch
>mains powered stuff.
..........
>For the most of it the 10 pulses of positive and negaitve source with a 10us
>duration and 10kV repeated once every minute is the basic lighting test


This sounds like a far cry from a 10,000,000V 10,000A lightning bolt.

What do the specs say about testing with a Wimshurst machine, or
something that actually emanates lightning bolts?

- danM

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2000\08\09@162624 by Dan Michaels

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Dennis Plunkett wrote:
............
>For the most of it the 10 pulses of positive and negaitve source with a 10us
>duration and 10kV repeated once every minute is the basic lighting test
>

To answer my own question, looking at these numbers you give for a
"basic lightning test", and since a real lightning bolt carries
maybe 10,000,000V and 10,000A, this little test obviously doesn't
simulate a direct hit - which would probably vaporize both the board
and the guys doing the testing [ie, you, me, and the people in the
next room].

No doubt, what this test simulates is a voltage/current surge as
"conducted" onto the board via power mains or signal lines, due to
a "putative" strike somewhere in the vicinity. In this case, only
a very small portion of the total energy will get to the board.

Any way you slice the strike, you're still stuck with my other
question about do you effectively use a Wimshurst machine to do
this kind of testing??

cheers,
- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
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2000\08\09@165911 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>Any way you slice the strike, you're still stuck with my other
>question about do you effectively use a Wimshurst machine to do
>this kind of testing??
>
>cheers,
>- Dan Michaels

Seems as though the risetime of the pulse is as significant as
the 'strength'  Maybe you could place a pickup loop near the
spark to pick up the 'induced' strike and conduct it to your
equipment?

Barry

Oh, and it's "Wimhurst".

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2000\08\09@171326 by James Paul

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Barry,

I realize I may be borderline nitpicking, but all references that I
have seen say it's 'Wimshurst', not 'Wimhurst'.  I don't know which
is actually the correct spelling though.  I also remember my college
prof. referring to it as a 'Wimshurst' too.  Oh well, enough on the
subject.  Just letting you know what I know.  If I'm wrong, I
apologise.

                                           Regards,

                                             Jim




On Wed, 09 August 2000, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

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2000\08\09@173250 by Arthur Brown

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pic's of wimshurst at this url about 1/2 way down the page No pic's though

http://chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/mpersci.htm

Regards Art

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