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'[PIC]: Need a flow sensor'
2004\05\03@194926 by Gabriel Caffese

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Hello everyone,

  I´m involved in a project in wich have to measeure how
many liters of diesel flowed to a motor (diesel consumption)
in a a predefined lapse of time.
  Measure will be made with a PIC micro, and so will the time.
  Now, does anyone know of a good and cheap turbine flow sensor
I could use for this project ?

  Thanks in advance,

       Gabriel.-

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2004\05\03@202456 by McReynolds, Alan

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When measuring consumption keep in mind that most diesels have a return pipe.  The idle flow through the system is much higher than the consumption in my experience.  So you will have to measure delta (inflow-outflow) very accurately.  
...Alan McReynolds

{Original Message removed}

2004\05\03@212441 by Russell McMahon

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>When measuring consumption keep in mind that most diesels have a return
pipe.  The idle flow through the system is much higher than the consumption
in my experience.  So you will have to measure delta (inflow-outflow) very
accurately.

You MAY be able to take a small "T" feed off the go & return system into the
injection system so only the delta flows in the leg of the T. If not then
the result (the actual flow calculated by subtracting return from feed) may
be "ill conditioned". eg if feed is 100 units and return is 98 units then a
1% error in measurement produces a 50% variation in final result.


       RM

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2004\05\03@221132 by M. Adam Davis

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Every time I've asked about this sort of application every seems to say
"Measure the injection pulses for one injector", and indicate that flow
sensors meant to measure such a small flow are very expensive, and
injectors are very accurately timed.

Of course, if this isn't an injected engine then this doesn't apply.

-Adam

Gabriel Caffese wrote:

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2004\05\03@234000 by Mike

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Well the Whirlpool 9100 front load washer has a flow sensor that tells the
computer if 10 gallons has been reached, I'm not exactly sure how it works
or if it would be compatible, but any repair shop that does warrantee work
for whirlpool should have one you can check out.
{Original Message removed}

2004\05\03@234547 by David VanHorn

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>
>   I4m involved in a project in wich have to measeure how
>many liters of diesel flowed to a motor (diesel consumption)
>in a a predefined lapse of time.
>   Measure will be made with a PIC micro, and so will the time.
>   Now, does anyone know of a good and cheap turbine flow sensor
>I could use for this project ?

If the injection system is electric, you can probably sense "squirts" and convert that to gallons.  Zemco car computers for fuel injection used to work that way.

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2004\05\04@002106 by Bob Axtell

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The most reliable way I've ever seem is the method used to measure
liquids for certain blood handling systems.

The liquid is in a flexible hose, which is mounted on the outside of a
wheel. Two roller cams press against the hose simultaneously, rolling as
they move. The liquid between the cams is trapped and pumped along at
the same time. Another roller cam catches as the forward one drops off.
Just keep count of the squirts by sensing when a roller cam passes by.

The main advantage of this scheme is that it works at almost all flow
rates; most flow meters have a minimum reliable flow rate.

And, gravity (or momentum) has no effect.


--Bob


David VanHorn wrote:

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2004\05\04@011249 by Shawn Wilton

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Yeah, it's called a peristaltic pump.


Shawn Wilton
Junior in CpE
MicroBiologist

Phone: (503) 881-2707
Email: .....shawnKILLspamspam@spam@black9.net

http://black9.net


Bob Axtell wrote:
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2004\05\04@033928 by ahid Sheikh

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I believe most new cars that have an onboard MPG meter use a combination
of the fuel guage, the mass airflow sensor (at least on gasonline
engines) and maybe even the injector pulses/RPM to calculate MPG. On my
last VW Jetta/Bora, the MPG reported by the car used to be close enough
(always within 10%) of the actual MPG. After I replaced a dead MAF
sensor on it, the reported MPG was way off and I had to adjust it using
the programming of the instrument cluster.

But I don't think it had a liquid flow sensor anywhere on the fuel
lines. At least I never saw one in the repair manuals or on the car
itself.

A friend of mine working on a similar project in school (long time ago)
used a small staging tank and sensors to see how quickly the tank was
depleted. Once the tank was almost empty, a small pump would refill it
from the main tank.
I have seen fuel consumption kits for boat engines at marine stores
which have a fuel flow sensor with them. But if I recall correctly, the
box for the kit said not for engines with return fuel lines.

Shahid

{Original Message removed}

2004\05\04@070742 by Roland

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Hi

If you want to make your own, you could make a drip counter. a small cavity
with a nozzle, and a light interrupter to count the drops.
It'll have to stay upright and be buffered with an air-pocket to prevent
squirts.
Not sure how temp changes in the diesel will affect drop size.
Of course, we're only talking about the fuel to be used that'll be measured.

Regards
Roland

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2004\05\04@131136 by Bob Japundza

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part 1 977 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 (decoded quoted-printable)

Floscan 201. Very easy to interface, but not cheap.  Most cars nowadays measure fuel consumption by counting the time the fuel injectors are open.

Regards,
Bob

Gabriel Caffese <gcaffesespamspam_OUTHOTPOP.COM> wrote ..
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