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PICList Thread
'Ding Dong! I2C calling!'
1999\09\16@214224 by M. F. LaBoo

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Thanx Quentin!  I went to the site and read some "perplexing and scary"
things.  Like, waving a License Application in my face.  Like, the FAQs all
being about how you have to submit a formal application to a Central
Scrutinizer who assigns codes, and something about how if the address code
was already used, you still have to pay for the application process...
Could it really be possible that I'd have to go thru any of this even
once -- let alone *four* times,  once for each -- for a one-off project like
this (a PIC-controlled 3-octave mini chimes)??  ;-}

I must be missing something obvious here.  Could someone please humor a
complete newbie to I2C and give me a wee bit of insight into how I would
know what code to send to address a specific one of 36 l/O pins  spread
across four PC8574P's ?  Any general info on l2C links, hardcopy resources,
projects, parts sources etc.  would also be greatly appreciated if you have
it close at hand.  I need to start getting up to speed.

My obvious knowledge deficit aside, this does look like an elegant solution
for my I/O needs, with the added benefit of learning about what looks like a
daw-gone flexible system capable of managing a whole host of
peripheral-related applications.  Thanks for pointing me towards l2C!

bOO
========================
From: Quentin <spam_OUTqscTakeThisOuTspamICON.CO.ZA>
Subject: Re: Ding Dong!


{Quote hidden}

1999\09\17@141735 by Barry King

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> Thanx Quentin!  I went to the site and read some "perplexing and scary"
> things.  Like, waving a License Application in my face.  Like, the FAQs all
> being about how you have to submit a formal application to a Central
> Scrutinizer who assigns codes, and something about how if the address code
> was already used, you still have to pay for the application process...
> Could it really be possible that I'd have to go thru any of this even
> once -- let alone *four* times,  once for each -- for a one-off project like
> this (a PIC-controlled 3-octave mini chimes)??  ;-}

Of course not.  For one-offs, you can use any 7 bit address that
suits your fancy.  Commercial products with FIXED addresses are
assigned to avoid address conflicts as much as possible.

If you want to SELL a product which embodies I2C, you have to
have a liscense (patented tech).  Buying a PIC with an SSP on it
confers liscense for the product (you already paid for it).

Beats me what the legal aspects are for selling a product with an
PIC with no I2C built in, and using I2C.

But If you're not selling it, you don't have to liscence it, and if your
addresses conflict its your problem.

> Any general info on l2C links, hardcopy resources,
> projects, parts sources etc.  would also be greatly appreciated if you have
> it close at hand.  I need to start getting up to speed.

The Phillips site has the bible for I2C, free for download.

Many of the manufacturers of Slave chips that use I2C are much
more helpful than the generic standard.   Example: the data sheet
for the Microchip 24LC65 tells you how to use that EEPROM chip,
which is I2C.

Side note, this month Nuts and Volts (hobby electronics 'zine)
started a series on I2C.  Its a tutuorial and does start at the
beginning!  So far, its superior to their usual standards. For
example, it seems to be factually correct so far :)

Did you have a specific question on the protocol?

------------
Barry King, KA1NLH
Engineering Manager
NRG Systems "Measuring the Wind's Energy"
Hinesburg, Vermont, USA
http://www.nrgsystems.com

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