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PICList Thread
'PIC on the Internet, emWare'
1999\03\24@192951 by Bob Drzyzgula

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On Thu, Mar 25, 1999 at 08:24:37AM +1000, Alexander Stepanets wrote:
>
> Where can I get CS8900 DataSheet?

http://www.cirrus.com/products/overviews/cs8900a.html

BTW, I believe that one possibly insurmountable problem
in implementing a TCP/IP stack on a PIC would be the
amount of RAM available in the typical PIC.  Unless one
also implements some sort of external RAM, it will become
extremely difficult to handle the buffers and state data
that would be required to participate in a full-fledged
TCP/IP world.

Also BTW, I posted a question a couple of weeks ago
about PIC networking and whether there was any packaged
network protocols for PICs on RS-485 networks; I was
reluctant to roll my own given how much time I have on
my project and how much I had to do. I received only on
response on that, a suggestion that I look at profibus
(http://www.profibus.com). However, that suggestion came
after I had already decided on a solution.

What I finally settled on is a commercial product called
emWare; URL is http://www.emware.com. I (or my office,
to be more accurate) has purchased the EMIT 3.0 SDK, a
single unlimited-use gateway license, and the port of the
emWare software to the PICmicro. This software is somewhat
costly to put into production ($200-500 per gateway and
$1 per controlled device), but it is very well thought
out. The emWare gateway is an http (web) server that will
pass off data and control requests to microcontrollers
out on any of several different communications busses:
RS-485 or Ethernet, or directly attached to the gateway
machine through RS-232. It can also handle devices that
can only be contacted via modem. The gateway software
includes some JavaBean componants that allow one to
implement a GUI user interface that can be accessed through
any Java-enabled browser. There also are C++ and
command-line APIs.

This software isn't for everyone or every project by
any means. But it exactly fits the bill for what I
was trying to do and I'd recommend looking at it if
you are designing a microcontroller network that needs
to be accessed from the Internet or any other TCP/IP
network. I've been tinkering with it for a few days
and have so far been quite impressed.

--Bob

--
============================================================
Bob Drzyzgula                             It's not a problem
spam_OUTbobTakeThisOuTspamdrzyzgula.org                until something bad happens
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